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20121120
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hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead
, absorb energy from the earthquake, deform, and also come back to its original geometry. what that meant was the building would be functional. it meant it wouldn't have to be abandoned and fixed. >> we have probably the greatest specification for concrete ever developed for a project that has a really innovative structural system. one of the things that's evident from the research that's been done is that concrete is responsible for a significant amount of co2 production. and that's worldwide. and we developed a way in which we could incorporate replacement material such as flag and fly ashe to supplement the portable cement and allow a big reduction in those carbon emissions associated with production from that poured cement. >> concrete for the building has a 70% replacement value with recycled materials fly ashe and recycled materials that would otherwise go to waste. reducing our carbon footprint in half. >> the way that we often do buildings in the city are often projects in the city is we go out and we do a low bid. somebody bids on something, we have to do everything that's expect
those changes for $3,000, $4,000, $5,000. they're oftentimes more energy- efficient. the general consensus is people like that. one other thing that i think is overlooked in terms of value, and i don't know of the survey talks about it, is landscaping and plants. lance camping, plants, and trees are really inexpensive compared to major remodels. i often feel it is something that is heavily overlooked. it as a lot of value. it is a touchy-really, emotional part of a property. oftentimes, we don't have front yards. maybe there should be a tree out front. maybe you should have potted plants lining the stairs going up. perhaps the rearguard in, although you never use it, doesn't matter if you don't get sunshine. plant flowers that do not need son. those are oftentimes good ways to spend money on adding value to your home. >> people that are selling their homes do need to have someone that will absolutely come in. i had a stager come in my house. you need to have another i that will absolutely have you get rid of the little things that you think make it look homey and people love it,
for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> creator father and we ask thanks this day and ask for blessing for those that prepared this food and nourish our souls. we thank you for the opportunity to gather, to honor four native americans from our community. remember those that are not with us, unable to be here, or traveling. we ask for blessing upon them, their families, their friends. we come before you. we are humbled two leggeds. we give things. honde,honde, the best it could possible me. to the singers, to the dancers, t
challenges. and it's challengin the best innovators in america to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number
in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has won smartest building in the world and we have honors such as the greenest city in north america, the walkable city, and the best green policies, the green tech of north america and forbes recognized that san francisco has the most green jobs in the united states. that's jobs. that's one of the most important things we are doing for the whole country. [applause] and we are creating and sustaining jobs as well as supporting new industries in our city. our energy watch program creates or su
renewable energy resources act. >> thank you. barbara hill, assistant general manager for power. i am here today to discuss with you the way we are proposing to comply with the california renewable energy resources act. it's more commonly referred to as the rpf legislation. the act requires the puc to meet 100% of our retail sales with hetch hetchy and rps [speaker not understood] generation. what we're proposing to do is rely on our existing processes where possible and appropriate to incorporate compliance into our budgeting and financial planning process. in most years, in 83% of all years, business as usual, no extra action is necessary on the city's part to comply with this legislation. we would need to buy any additional rps supplies, 83% of the time. what i'm here today for is to get input and direction from you on our proposal to give our general manager the authority to procure rps supplies to meet any unexpected requirements when they do occur, typically in dry years or in the event of an unexpected generator outage. and to set a cost limitation for compliance, which is allowed u
by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco whi
energy north america and kick the program o off. that early notification period needs to meld well with the formal launch of the statutory opt out period, that's the opt out program we've talked about before that's required by the state. so we want those two components to work well together. we'll be presenting to you our key communication strategies and our overall budget, and again the proposed clean power sf timeline that factors in these changes, and in particular the early notification period concept. to given you a quick overview of the timeline, and with an emphasis on the action item for you, i'm turning to slide three, where, at this time period, we are reaching out to yourselves, to members of the board, to the mayor's office, we having the joint meeting with lafco to make sure we're really on track with the intentions from the board and the mayor, making sure that we are putting together a customer notification education plan that's supportive of your intentions. we'll be asking you to approve that plan on the 30th, in the joint meeting, and also to allow us to go forwar
provide real value to you such as saving money, improving energy efficiency, and protecting the environment. so, the green button here we are in san francisco, i can say with some public comfort that pg&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that's real money if you think about it at a commercial or industrial scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we'
that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambiguous commitment, and i believe that the u.s. navy is capable of mai
, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> we're at the press entrance. there is so much excitement in the air. over 20 live trucks, lots of media. we're going to go behind the scenes and give you a sneak peek all the excitement and everything that's going on. let's go. as you can see, pearl street has completely closed for the media trucks to park here. now, we've got trucks from almost all the news stations in the city becauseertionv r everyone is going to be coretionv the big event. we have the microwave towers goi
process. in san francisco most of the energy is used by commercial customers. we will not be able to achieve that big beautiful build-out that we're planning without those commercial customers being put into an opt out so enough of them stay in to get the bonding ability and the economies of scale to make sure that we can do the full build out and hire the thousands of people, et cetera. thanks. >> you said that marin opt in? >> no, marin, they did their initial thing a couple of years ago. they just completed their enrollment and enrolled all of their customers a few months ago, and that included commercial customers who were then able to opt out if they wanted to. but they enrolled everybody. and i know that -- yes. >> president torres: okay. have any further comments? no? motion to assert city attorney privilege as requested. >> so moved. >> second. >> president torres: we're going to move all those in favor signify by saying aye. >> ayes. >> president torres: motion carries. let's move into closed session. >.any public comment before we o into closed session? >> i think she ha
happen you can get it done and i just want to thank you guys for all your energy and excitement you bring to san francisco and for the giants day in and day out. you all are the best. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> well, -- audience: romo, romo. >> well, first off congratulations san francisco. we definitely couldn't have done it without you guys. i will venture to say -- there is one thing i noticed about my team we are a great example of this city. look at the diversity of personalities, where we all come from, the different faces from different stories and we all have one goal in mine. we had one job in mine. we had one dream in mine and that is to be world series champions with this group and i am proud to say that. you guys the same thing. we couldn't have done it without you, the city of san francisco. like i said you guys better be proud. you need to be proud and i will tell you for dang sure we are all world series champions and wearing orange and black in san francisco. [cheers and applause] >> all right. now i would like to introduce two more gentlemen. the firs
into the small art gallery of public works. part of the energy of the venue comes from having that art gallery. having a small workshop with a few resident artists who work on art during the day. it provides a certain energy. when that moves on to the employees were working there during the night, coming in contact with patrons, you have a great start and a good experience. great talent, visuals, who have done the other thing for the most part. lots of responses. >> thank you. dmitri, while enhancing your out dope -- outdoor event, how important is the creative contact to make sure it you have customers who return over and over again? >> our creative content, you know, it is pretty out there. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we pr
with everybody. all of the beautiful courage that it takes to be up here. a lot of energy to the healing circle as well. as a juvenile, i was in juvenile hall and i went through that whole system myself. i have worked with tattoo removal, i went to other development programs. through personal experience and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorio
. that means more than 40 percent of the chilean population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that things happen at night. i don't know why, but it always happen at night. so we are leading on february 27 at 3.24 and you can see in light blue the time when the first wave arrived the coast because the epicenter was so close to the coast. so it's no more than 10 minutes and at the same time the waves start moving through the pacific ocean and in 21 hours it hits the coast of hawaii. so everybody was affected because of that. in mexico, for instance, the variation of time was 1 1/2 meters. as you can see there, when that happened, 3.34, immediate
mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the elevator. imagine you are going into the airport. you would not get on the first airplane departing, you would get on the airplane that is going to the city you are going. we are doing the same here. in this case, we are going to the ninth floor. this building has security, so i also have an access card, which gives us permission, and then we go to the assigned elevator, which is elevator a. >> and this is only stopping at floors 4 and 9. i do not see any buttons in here at all, except for the door and the alarm. >> we only have the standard buttons required by code and safety, but there is no need to have floor numbers anymore. >> and it does not make a lot of stops. it goes to your floor and everyone else. >> the system it efficiency, because
are a consideration, a buyer could have summary information about if the home has been measured for energy performance, and has some independent organization confirmed that you have actually installed -- that there is a reason to call it green. that has only been out there few months. another metric of the fact that could have on the market when that becomes a little more populated in the database would be looking at whether that affects the days on the market, which i would expect to be more likely a factor of change, because if you are filtering your search on that criteria, you have more buyers looking at those particular homes. >> i think it is a very good measure. as the measures become standardized, you are right. it will be something that people will look for. they will say other things about the property. they could say, this property owner really thought things through carefully. that is a good thing, versus someone who didn't. sure. >> the aesthetics are really important. we are seeing more things that are a lot more choices. i just put in new zealand pine, and approved material. we are even
it will never happen -- when you do not have the energy anymore? that scared of a piece of blank paper and a collection coming up in six weeks -- that does not scare you? >> yes, but i tried to protect myself. for example, i go to a flea market, and nt place. when i see something that i find interesting, even if i have no interest in anything at the moment, i say that one day i will do something from that. i know that there was work on it. i think i have to burn it, because at the end, i take too much time to look at it. but, yes, i mean, to be honest, i think will realize what time that i have no more of the passion, which will mean i will stop. i think it is better. honestly, before i was doing that profession, because i was not at peace with the fact that i was rejected, so i was inventing a lot of things. at the moment, i started to work -- i finish. because i do the things that i'd love to do, why should i live now. there's no reason to lie? because i am accepted through my work? why should i lie? because i do not want to live again in my old days. but i will always interested in
and most of the energy that comes into san francisco is piped in from other places so we have to look at everything from a regional perspective. in terms of what we're doing with our infrastructure, we look at many risks to our systems to improve their reliability, both gas and electric. while we talk about earthquakes quite a bit, we look more at ground movement in general, whether it be earthquake related, land slide related, but in terms of our reliability all those risks are looked at and there's on-going efforts to increase the reliability of both the electric system and the gas system throughout the san francisco area and through the northern and system part of our state. we have hundreds of millions of dollars of pipeline replacement happening which is a major risk in a major earthquake. most people are aware in loma prieta the pipeline held pretty well but we are trying to build in a better manner to withdraw earthquakes. on the electric side, things are pretty well proat the timed already. things shut themselves off. depending on the magnitude of the earthquake, it could
to shad dee alcarra. who's-who really has been a beakon of energy inside of our office at the mayor's office and neighborhood service and is sweating through our work to make sure we are well on point to have a great celebration here at city hall and so again shad dei thank you very much for your work. to all of you here tonight from the city family i want to saw thank you for joining us here as well and to really encourage you to take part of in all of the if he istivities that we have to offer here at city hall and for those of you who have an opportunity to tine sign in at the front please do so we can reach you through the mayor's office and neighborhood services center which highlights the many services and if he is activities that occur in san francisco and in our city. and so while we take a pause, for a moment, to bring some more art into our hall, we would like to pause for one more musical enter lewd and to begin with the rest of our program. so thank you all very much. ♪ ♪ (applause). . (applause). . . >> thank you guys so much for that beautiful performance can w
. let's go prop b, let's go joe d. thank you so much. [ applause ] >> all right, is there high-energy today? fantastic. a couple of other colleagues, peers in the city family, tom, who is our arts commission executive director. thank you for joining us. we have a partnership in the arts commission that every new building has public art. i don't know if our artist for north beach is here, bill fontana, we're excited about his work and the opportunity to have beautiful art as part of the project. so bill, thank you. also, we talked about how important access is to our neighborhood libraries and today we have our acting director in the mayor's office of disability, carla johnson. carla. thank you for joining us. thank you for being here today. [ applause ] our next supervisor who also does not need much of an introduction because he is at every single library opening. a terrific staunch supporter and advocate for public libraries supervisor scott wiener. thank you for joining us [ applause ] . >> thank you, luis and congratulations on this great day moving forward. i go to library ope
doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of t
. keep? energy bars. dry food. canned vegetables. can corn, can peas, you can drain that and drink the water and eat the vegetables. buy can food that you eat normally. and a can opener. first aid kit, have 3. have you a small one in the car, have a nice sized one for home and make sure you have one at work. make sure if you are a diabetic or have a heart condition, something that you normal take have a little supply. have a storage area for this. consider this. if you have a supply kit, make sure you have one that's mobile. mobile meaning, if you have to evacuate a square mile for disaster or terrorist or anything, have it in there with you in case you are on your own for a bit. you might not be in your home. you might be somewhere else. there's a tsunami coming in. if you have kids at home what do you keep for them? make sure you keep them entertained and have food they like. the most useful tool in a disaster? scissors. if you use clothes you will be cold. [inaudible]. duct tape. many uses. you want garbage bags. line the toilet with trash bags. you want to line it, line it up
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)

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